A known occurrence within almost all college students and college aged youths is that amongst these age groups there is a massive level of alcohol consumptions and binge drinking. This has led many experts to ask the question: what makes binge drinking and exceptional levels of alcohol consumption such a social norm? In the academic study, “From Animal House to Old School: A Multiple Mediation Analysis of the Association between College Drinking Movie Exposure and Freshman Drinking and Its Consequences” done by Timothy Osberg, Katherine Billingsley, and Maribeth Insana, blame college movies that promote and glorify the consumption of alcohol are to blame. A different study done by Andrew Graham and Jean Adams titled, “Alcohol Marketing in Televised English Professional Football: A Frequency Analysis,” blames the marketing of alcohol during sporting events as a cause for this college attitude.

In Osberg, Billingsley, and Insana’s study of 479 college freshman students, they tested their hypothesis that, “increased exposure to movies that glorify college drinking [would] impact…viewers’ beliefs about the role of alcohol in college life”(Osberg, Billingsley, Isana, 923). They did test this by showing a range of college movies that promote the excessive consumption of alcohol to these students. After watching these movies the students were given two questionnaires about a month apart, the results of both showed a connection between these movies and freshman year drinking. At the end of their study they wrote, “exposure to movies glorifying the college drinking culture was found to have direct and indirect effects on the drinking behaviors of college freshmen”(Osberg, Billingsley, Isana, 930).

The study done by Andrew Graham and Jean Adams showed the correlation between alcohol marketing and advertisements at sporting events and college aged drinking. They created their study by watching six televised soccer games in the UK and counting the number of visual alcohol references. In their results they wrote, “The six broadcasts lasted a total of 1101 min (18 h and 21 min)…with a mean of 340 and median of 257 per broadcast”(Graham, Adams). In the conclusion of their study they saw that the majority of the images showed, “encouraging overconsumption or associating alcohol with social or sexual success, irresponsible behaviour”(Graham, Adams).

Even though both studies were testing different things: one testing the correlation between college movies glorifying the consumption of alcohol and college drinking, and the other testing the connection between alcohol marketing at sporting events and college age drinking, they both had very similar results. The results from  Graham and Adams’ study showed that the majority of alcohol advertisements showed, “encouraging overconsumption or associating alcohol with social or sexual success, irresponsible behaviour”(Graham, Adams). It is also a known fact that any college humor movie shows the encouragement of overconsumption, irresponsible behavior, and social and sexual success with the consumption of alcohol. So it only makes sense that both college movies and sporting advertisements have an effect on college drinking.

It is important in this day and age to understand how easily one can be made to think and believe the social and environmental norms of any college consists of an excessive amount of  alcohol consumption and binge drinking, yet this is not the reality.  

 

Graham, Andrew, and Jean Adams. “Alcohol Marketing in Televised English ProfessionalFootball:A Frequency Analysis.” Alcohol and Alcoholism (2013): n. pag. Print.

Osberg, Timothy M., Katherine Billingsley, and Maribeth Insana. “From Animal House to OldSchool: A Multiple Mediation Analysis of the Association between College Drinking Movie Exposure and Freshman Drinking and Its Consequences.” Addictive Behaviors 37.8 (2012): 922-30. Print.

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