I beg to still differ the question does media influence the way people, especially women, feel about weight?

In the article “Waif Goodbye! Average-Size Female Models Promote Positive Body Image and Appeal to Consumers” by Diedrichs and Lee a survey was conducted to see the effect that women’s magazines have on women concerning weight. In the study, there were 171 women and 120 who were  between 17 ad 25 years old who participated in only looking at a certain type of magazine (Diedrichs, Lee 1277). One group looked at magazines featuring no models, another looked at magazines featuring skinny models, and the third group looked at magazines containing average-size models (Diedrichs, Lee 1278). The results of this survey showed that the women and men who looked at the average size models had the most positive ideal body image and that women and men who looked at magazines without any models had the second highest ideal body image (Diedrichs, Lee 1282). This goes to show that the women and men feel more confident about themselves in regards to their bodies when they see average-sized models instead of thin models.

In comparison, another article by Elizabeth and Jessica Boyd discusses this issue of body image in regards to women. This article “Swimsuit Issues: Promoting Positive Body Image in Young Women’s Magazines” is about looking at different magazines and seeing the effect the size of the models has on women, especially young women (Elizabeth and Jessica Boyd 102). In a survey, 10 young women’s magazines swimsuit articles including DollyGirlfriendCleoCosmopolitanMadisonShopTil You DropIn StyleMarie ClaireHarper’s Bazaar, and Australian Vogue were looked at to see the influence of using average-sized models (Elizabeth and Jessica Boyd 104). The results of this showed that girls were had a more positive and healthy body image and overall felt more confident in themselves (Elizabeth and Jessica Boyd 102-103). This goes to show that even though media, especially women’s magazines, can cause women to feel negatively about their bodies, it is trying to do more promoting of a positive body image that resembles the average person instead of a thin model.

Even though these articles had two completely different surveys and means to gathering information, they both agree that when women see average-sized models in magazines they feel more confident in themselves and in their bodies (Diedrichs, Lee 1288). The first survey/article shows that there are still magazines who put thin models in their articles, but the second survey/article shows that there are changes being made in big time women’s magazines to promote a more positive self image.

These two articles are important because they recognize that even though women’s magazines are causing weight issues in women there is efforts being made to fix it. These efforts such as using average-size models will help decrease eating disorders and bring self-confidence to women ranging from young teens to adults. Weight is an ongoing issue in today’s society due to all the comparisons we make of ourselves and others to those thin models in magazines. By women’s magazines taking a stance and promoting a healthy body image women will start to not feel as if they have to compare themselves to anyone but them-self.

Works Cited

Boyd, Elizabeth Reid, and Jessica Moncrieff-Boyd. “Swimsuit Issues: Promoting Positive Body Image In Young Women’s Magazines.” Health Promotion Journal Of Australia 22.2 (2011): 102-106. SPORTDiscus with Full Text. Web. 20 Sept. 2013.

Diedrichs, Phillippa C., and Christina Lee. “Waif Goodbye! Average-Size Female Models Promote Positive Body Image And Appeal To Consumers.” Psychology & Health 26.10 (2011): 1273-1291. SPORTDiscus with Full Text. Web. 20 Sept. 2013.

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